Whats Our Verdict: Hanging vs. Free Standing?

Frustratingly, there isn't really a "better" choice here. Many experienced boxers prefer the standard hanging bags to free-standing bags. However, if you’re tight on space or a beginner boxer or martial artist, then a free-standing bag might be a better place to start. It all depends on your needs and your experience level.

Punch Bag Workouts

Now that we’ve gone over some of the pros of punching bags (Which is also called ‘Boxscke’ in German) and free-standing bags, let’s discuss some of the best ways you can use them.

Stance

Your legs should be spread shoulder-width apart. If you’re right-handed, put your left leg in front, jab with your left hand, and strike with your right.

Jab

Jabs are a quick, short punch with your non-dominant hand, intended to create an opening in your opponent’s defenses and make an opportunity for a more powerful strike with your dominant hand.

As you extend your non-dominant hand, turn your knuckles towards the ceiling as your arm reaches out.

Cross

A cross punch is a power punch with your rear hand. Pivot on the ball of your foot and turn your hips as you follow through with the strike.

Uppercut

This traditional boxing movement is a power strike at an upward trajectory. Bend your elbows at 90-degree angles and shoulder-width apart, and lower your body into a slight squat. Scoop your striking arm under and up to the left, until you’re in a standing position and your fist is at chin height.

Try practicing each of these jabs on your punching bag. Alternate striking with each arm for 45-second intervals, while taking 15-second intervals in between.

 

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